Planning appeals

Page updated on: 08/09/2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Planning applications can be submitted as usual and are being processed as soon as possible; however, we would advise you to make online applications if able to as our offices remain closed to staff, resulting in significant delays for paper applications.

We are experiencing a backlog of applications due to lockdown which had an impact on service delivery, and saw a number of staff re-deployed to essential frontline services. Therefore, it may take a period of up to three months, on top of the usual delivery timescales, to determine applications.

The Planning Committee is currently meeting remotely twice a month in order to reduce the backlog as much as possible; and priority will be given to employment-related applications.

Site visits will only be carried out, where they are deemed necessary; along with the posting of site notices where practicable. Neighbour notification letters are being used where appropriate.

Enforcement complaints are being progressed where they are considered by officers to be of high or medium impact (for example, where there are health and safety implications) or matters that are able to progress in the absence of a site visit.

We would like to thank you for your patience during this period.

Please continue to visit our Newsroom for the latest information. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

If you receive a refusal of planning permission or are unhappy about the conditions imposed you can make an appeal to the Planning Inspectorate.

However, you should look carefully at the reasons why the Council turned down your application before you consider an appeal. It may be possible to negotiate with the Council and amend the application to make it more acceptable. If you change your proposal and apply again within one year of the refusal you won’t have to pay another fee. An appeal should only ever be a last resort.  There are 3 ways of submitting an appeal:

  • Written Representation (cheapest, simplest & most common procedure)
  • Informal Hearing (discussion forum) or
  • Public Inquiry (full cross examination)

The first option is the most common, especially for householder and other minor applications. Appeals for more detailed major applications tend to be decided by an informal hearing or a full public inquiry. 

A written representation statement typically includes an appraisal of the scheme and issues, together with maps, plans and photographs but not oral evidence. Whichever procedure is used, the Inspector will visit the site to judge the effect of your proposal on the area.

If you, the Council or the Planning Inspectorate do not agree to the written procedure, a hearing or an inquiry may be arranged.

Planning